InnovaBuzz Episode #42 – Tamala Huntley

TamalaHuntley

Tamala Huntley on digital strategy with marketing automation and online systems

In this episode number 42  of the InnovaBuzz podcast, Tamala Huntley, an entrepreneur and digital marketer talks to us about digital marketing, systems, marketing automation, work life balance, success and life as a digital nomad. Listen to the podcast to find out more.

Listen to the Podcast

Stay focused on who you are wanting to serve, because the most important part is knowing who your audience is.

Tamala Huntley

Show Highlights

Some of the highlights of this episode include:

  • Keeping things systemised and simple makes the work easier and more enjoyable.
  • Keep things systemised and simple and using technology to help automate tasks helps with the ambition of casing your business, while still maitaining a balance between business and your “other” life joys.
  • Set specific days that you don’t work on client projects, but your own business.
  • Really knowing your audience and customers and how you serve them makes everything else flow – the communication with them.
  • Gain leverage in your business with training and classes that allow a one to many interaction,
  • Build recurring revenue in your business.

How you define success just depends on your personal choices and what it is that is relevant for you.

Tamala Huntley

The Buzz – Our Innovation Round

Here are Tamala’s answers to the questions of our Innovation round.

  • #1 thing to be more innovative –Listen to your audience. Find our their needs and problems.
  • Best thing for new ideas – Survey your current customers and look at what people are asking about in groups.  Listen!
  • Favourite tool for innovation – Evernote for notes, outlines, reports and more.  An of course Ontraport.
  • Keep project / client on track – Ongoing communication. Set clear expectations at the beginning and listen to feedback.
  • Differentiate – Be YOU.  Show your personality.  You can’t get any more differentiated than that.

To Be a Leader

Decide what to focus on and become the best at it.

Reach Out

You can reach out and thank Tamala via Facebook or at TamalaHuntley.com.

Suggested Guest

Tamala suggested I interview Lisa Wells, another digital marketing specialist and Allegra Sinclair a personal development coach, on future InnovaBuzz podcasts. So Lisa and Allegra keep an eye on your Inbox for an invitation from me, for the InnovaBuzz Podcast, courtesy of Tamala Huntley.

Links

Full Transcript

Click to Read…
Intro:

Hi, I’m Jürgen Strauss from Innovabiz. Welcome to Episode No 42 of the InnovaBuzz Podcast – designed to help smart businesses with an interest in innovation become even more innovative.

In this episode, my guest is Tamala Huntley, who is a Web Developer and Internet Marketer based in Florida in the USA.  She helps service based entrepreneurs eliminate technical roadblocks to grow their businesses.

We talk about serving the customer, systems to make work enjoyable and simple, work life balance, living a nomad’s life, preferably on the beach and lot’s more.

Let’s get into the Innovation Hive and get the Buzz from Tamala Huntley.

 

Interview
Hi, I’m Jürgen Strauss from Innovabiz, and I’m really excited to have here with me on today’s episode of the Innovabuzz Podcast, from Houston, in Texas at the moment, Tamala Huntley. Welcome, Tamala. It’s a privilege to have you on the podcast.

Tamala:
Hi, Jürgen. Thank you for having me. I am honored to be here.

Jürgen
Now Kronda Adair suggested we get you on the podcast, so a big shout out to Kronda.

Tamala:
Yes, that’s my online buddy.

Jürgen
Okay…

Tamala:
We’ve never met in person.

Jürgen
You haven’t met in person?

Tamala:
We’ve never met in person, only online.

Jürgen
Okay. Well, I haven’t met Kronda either in person, but we have chatted a lot online. So, we need to organize a get-together somewhere.

Tamala:
Yes.

Jürgen
Alright. So, Tamala is an entrepreneur who helps business life and wellness coaches implement digital strategy with marketing funnels, with online systems, with automation and websites. And essentially what she says is “I deal with the techie stuff so that my clients don’t have to.” Is that a good snapshot?

Tamala:
Yes, that’s pretty much the gist of it. I actually kind of changed it a little to encompass cultures, experts, creatives, and pretty much any service-based entrepreneur because I kind of decided that I wanted to do services but also training. So, I have a combination of both.

Jürgen
Okay. And you also have a lot of online training programs as well, don’t you?

Tamala:
Yes, I have I think probably about four right now, and then I’m working on one that’s actually going to be my signature product based off of the process that I use to approach all of my projects and what I try to help my clients do with their online businesses.

Jürgen
That’s great. So before we start talking about digital strategy and online systems and marketing funnels, automation, and innovation, let’s find out a bit more about you as a person. What did you want to be when you were a kid? What did you want to be when you grew up?

Tamala:
When I was a kid, the furthest that I thought out was to be a computer engineer. I’ve always kind of had an entrepreneurial spirit. I sold Avon when I was 10. But I always wanted to be a computer engineer, and I actually ended up going to school for electrical engineering because of the college that I went to, which was in Florida, where I’m from, that was the closest thing that they had to computer engineering.

Jürgen
Alright. So, computer engineering but you ended up in electrical engineering. And did you then work in computer engineering or did you end up as an electrical engineer?

Tamala:
I ended up as an electrical engineer. I actually worked at Texas Instruments for about seven years. And I was an electrical engineer basically doing applications engineering initially, and then because I always loved marketing and business, I switched over to technical marketing. And that’s what I was doing from that time to the time that I left.

Jürgen
Alright. And when did you discover WordPress?

Tamala:
I discovered WordPress in 2004, I believe it was. I actually, after I left Texas Instruments, I actually had my own bookstore. So, I graduated college in 1997, I started an online bookstore in 1998, I taught myself HMTL and ColdFusion and all that stuff, databases. I did it the hard way. This was like before WordPress. So, I did an online bookstore, and then eventually I had a physical location. And then eventually after that, I started working in a full-time industry as an executive assistant, and a project manager, executive project manager. And so I did a website for a church secretary, and I used WordPress to do it. And that’s when I first used WordPress, it was like 2004, 2005 I believe it was.

Jürgen
Right. And that would have been, what Version 2.2. It’s changed a lot since then, hasn’t it?

Tamala:
Oh, most definitely. Most definitely. It gets better and better.

Jürgen
It does, yes. So, tell us a little bit more about your current business then.

Tamala:
My current business kind of evolved from …. After I did that first website and then joined my own, making edits to my own website and that kind of thing, some of my friends wanted me to do websites for them, and then it kind of grew and grew into more of a side business more than anything. Because to be honest, I didn’t like dealing with customers and so … which is odd. So it kind of evolved from there, and over time, that’s almost like 18 years now … So, over time it’s just evolved and evolved into what I do now. I’ve always studied internet marketing and studied different strategies and that kind of thing. And so I just kind of evolved with the internet and with online marketing.

Jürgen
Yes, and I like your philosophy around keeping things simple but having it as a system that delivers results.

Tamala:
Yes, I’m all about keeping things simple. Simple makes the work more enjoyable. You know, I kind of approach everything from an engineer’s perspective. We figure out what the problem is, and then we gather all of the pieces, and then we break it down into steps. And so that’s just pretty much how I’ve been trained to think. So that kind of how I approach everything.

Jürgen
So, what do you see as the biggest challenges in your business?

Tamala:
There’s many. Probably more than anything it’s always finding that balance between working in your business and working on it, you know, taking the time to actually do those marketing things, taking the time to actually do the things that grow your business. Especially when you’re in a service-based business, you can really get bogged down in doing the work for everybody else and then kind of being stuck in your own business because you’re not allotting that time to work on your own business.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s definitely a challenge most small businesses face. And what are your techniques for tackling that?

Tamala:
I just decide there are certain days that I’m going to work only on my own business and not work on client projects, and having specific days and specific times that I focus on client projects versus my own. And making myself stick to those times because on a day that I may be working on my business, I may get an email from a client that’s something they think is urgent or something that needs to be done right away, and you just kind of have to force yourself to stay focused on what your goals are for that day.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s a great technique. I tend to do the same. Set aside a day and say that’s a work-on-the-business day.

Tamala:
Yes. I mean you can look up, you can start out it’s Monday, and you look up and it’s Friday, and you’re like, “What the heck did I do all week??”

Jürgen
That’s right, Yes. Particularly if there’s some problem that is really challenging or takes up a lot of time because there’s lots of bits and pieces to pull together.

Tamala:
Exactly. Yes.

Jürgen
So, how do you … I mean you talk a lot about automation, and I know you’re an Ontraport user and a big fan of digital marketing. So how do you set up your own sales process?

Tamala:
That has evolved over time too. I’ve gone from no systems and process to complicated systems and processes, back full circle to simple. So, what I just try to do is I have a system for getting leads and getting people into my funnel, and then once they’re in there, following up with them when people want services. I have a process that I use for service-based projects. And so there’s a needs assessment or a form that a person would fill out and then from that form we would do a phone call, and then from the phone call we would go to the next step if it’s something that they decide to hire me. So, the systems and the processes have evolved along with the type of services that I offer. Because there was a time where I offered several different smaller services, and then I kind of got to the point where I decided I want to do bigger jobs, like one or two bigger jobs, and then at the same time work on creating more recurring income, more passive income that’s not necessarily 100% passive, right, when you’re doing courses and that kind of thing, but to really migrate towards doing more of those and less service-based things where I have to be sitting at my computer all the time.

Jürgen
Yes. And Troy Dean says there’s no such thing as passive income.

Tamala:
Right.

Jürgen
So, recurring income certainly is something that really transforms a business, and particularly if you’ve got those courses, because you get a lot of leverage out of it, don’t you? You put together something once and it’s evergreen for quite some time without any further involvement from you.

Tamala:
Exactly. So, basically, you know, just trying to make sure that I have an intake process and a process to close out projects so that they don’t linger. Communicating during a job. So, at one point it was kind of difficult because I was trying to put two different types of clients in the same process. And I had to understand or realize that some clients are service-based, they’re done-for-you clients, and some are DIY, where they want to do it themselves, and it’s two different processes for that.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s fascinating, because I’m going a similar kind of analysis at the moment, and came to the realization that there are definitely the two different types of clients, and two levels of budgets and differing needs as well.

Tamala:
Exactly.

Jürgen
Now, one of the things we were chatting before we started the interview proper about the various places you’ve lived in recently, and you’re very much location independent, aren’t you?

Tamala:
I am, I am. And I love being location independent. I’m not really a minimalist. I want to say that I’m a minimalist, but again, I like life simple, I like business simple. Everything that I need pretty much travels with me in two suitcases. So, I’m as location independent as you can be.

Jürgen
That’s fantastic. And isn’t it wonderful with the internet today, that it’s possible to do that and still run a business?

Tamala:
Absolutely. Absolutely. And, you know, I think everybody kind of has to find their own way in doing it and do it in a way that works for them. You know, some people don’t want to travel – which I’m one of these types of people, I’m not really a traveler per se, like I’m not one who likes to travel all the time, like go from place to place every week or every month. I like to get to a place and kind of settle for a little while and then figure out the next place. And it took going to Costa Rica, my first international trip, it took doing that to really kind of help me figure out what it was that I like and what I didn’t like.

Jürgen
That’s fascinating. So, you spent six months in Costa Rica?

Tamala:
I did. And originally I went there with the intention to stay, like for a while, residency and all this stuff, after doing research, I was going to stay there. And then as it got closer to the time to go, I realized I don’t really want to stay there. Like, I do want to visit different places. And so then my intention was, okay, I’ll go here for a little while and then I’ll figure out where I want to go next. And then after being there, I realized I don’t really want to go to different places all the time, like back to back. So, it’s just kind of going with the flow and just kind of figuring out what feels right, you know, at the time, and figuring out what works for what I’m doing at the time and just kind of going with the flow – which, as an engineer, is like totally new for me.

Jürgen
That’s right, normally you have a process that you follow strictly, right?

Tamala:
Yes, very Type A.

Jürgen
Okay. What are some of the innovative things you do in your business, then, because obviously there’s probably a couple of levels you’ve talked about evolving the business and matching the client needs, but also the particular needs you have when you’re location independent and traveling around.

Tamala:
You know, again, it goes back to my mantra of keeping things simple. I try to use technology that helps me to keep things automated, to keep things as simple as I can. I’ve always kind of been slightly a rebel, and so I don’t necessarily believe in doing things just like everybody does them or just because it’s the way that it’s always been done. But at the same time, when something’s working, I figure if it’s working, you know, don’t break what’s already working. So, I don’t know. I guess I try to just kind of stay aware of what my clients need, trying to constantly stay focused on who I’m wanting to serve, because to me that’s like one of the most important parts is knowing who your audience is. And then you kind of flow with what they need or what they want and figure out how to solve the problems that they have because that’s what people want from you.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s fabulous advice, isn’t it. And I’ve been doing, as I said earlier, I’ve been doing quite a bit in terms of putting together training programs for different audiences and so on. And I always ask myself the question, okay, where do I start this training program, what’s the first thing you need to know? And the answer is always the same, it’s who’s your audience, who are you serving, and what problem are you fixing?

Tamala:
Exactly. Exactly. It makes everything else flow. You know, not that it would just be easy, but it just makes everything else flow. You know, what you are going to say in your advertising. What you are going to say in your training. How you are going … You know, what’s your messaging going to be. What kind of emails are you going to send? When you know exactly who you’re talking to, all of that stuff kind of flows.

Jürgen
Exactly. Yes. So, if you had a magic wand that you could wave and fix one thing in your business, what would that be?

Tamala:
Whatever would allow me to live at the beach 24/7.

Jürgen
Okay!

Tamala:
Let’s see. What would I fix? I think probably the biggest thing for me is keeping things simple but also being able to scale. I always, you know, lately I’ve kind of gone back and forth between how big do I like, or do I want to have an agency, because I kind of went that route where I had a project manager that was like I worked all the time for me. She was still contract but worked all the time for me, and then I had different contractors. And it wasn’t simple. I could be lazy. I could see using “simple” as a euphemism for “lazy.” I don’t know. So, just trying to decide how do I, what do I need to implement or what do I need to do in order to be able to scale but also maintain the type of lifestyle that I want. Because I believe that success, you know, how you define success just depends on your personal choices and what it is that is relevant for you.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s great advice.

Tamala:
You know, like there’s no certain number, there’s no certain number of dollar amount and that kind of thing. For me, it’s all relative and it’s all based on what is successful to you. I’m more of a person who is moved by creating memories and moments than I am by just a dollar amount. So, it just kind of depends. But if anything, probably scaling, how I can scale better and faster and still maintain the type of lifestyle that I want.

Jürgen
Yes. You said a number of really interesting things there which I think are great. Firstly, having your own measure, so not trying to live up to somebody else’s measure, and knowing what that is. And then being able to scale a business to the point where you can continue to do the things you love.

Tamala:
Exactly.

Jürgen
And it sounds like being at the beach is what you love.

Tamala:
Absolutely. I’m a simple girl. Beach and books and I’m good.

Jürgen
Okay. Yes. And so a good internet connection on the beach would be ideal.

Tamala:
Right. Exactly.

Jürgen
Alright then. Well, this has been wonderful. I think it might be time to move onto our innovation round, which is designed to help our audience. And they’re primarily innovators and leaders in their field, so I’d like to give them some tips from your experience. So, I’m going to ask you a series of five questions, and hopefully we’ll get some really insightful answers that’s going to inspire everyone and help them do something awesome as a result.

Tamala:
Okay.

Jürgen
So, what the #1 thing you think anyone needs to do to be more innovative?

Tamala:
I think it comes from listening, listening to your audience. And whether that is …. I don’t go in Facebook groups and spending a lot of time in groups and things like that. I don’t go in them to post and try to get customers or clients and use it as a way where you’re constantly posting in different groups. I don’t use it like that because I’m an introvert by nature. But I do go in groups to see what people are saying their needs are, what people are posting as problems that they have. And I think you can get a lot of insight, especially if you’re in a group where your target market is, you can get a lot of insight on what people’s needs are and then you can decide how you can serve those people or meet those needs in a way that is different than what most people are doing. Because so much of what we see now, it all looks the same. It always sounds the same.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s right. Well, that’s great advice, and it comes back to what you said earlier about focusing on who you want to serve and who the ideal customer is and what they need. So, what’s the best thing you’ve done to develop new ideas or new products?

Tamala:
I have surveyed my current customers. Again, like I said, I’ve gone into groups and kind of saw what people were asking questions about. I’m not … Again, I’m an introvert, so I’m not really like the kind of person who will show up at every networking event and every conference and that kind of thing because that takes a lot of energy. So, I just kind of look for ways to listen to my audience and listen to what people want and what people are saying they want, whether it’s going to podcasts, listening to podcast interviews … Just trying to find ways where I know that my target market is and listening to what they’re concerns are.

Jürgen
Yes, it’s the same message, isn’t it, listen to what people are asking or what the needs are.

Tamala:
Because that drives everything pretty much, right?

Jürgen
Yes, it does. And it always surprises me that people forget that. So, what’s your favorite tool or system for improving your own productivity and allowing you to be more innovative?

Tamala:
I would have to say … I actually have two. Evernote is like my favorite of all things because I can use it for so many different things, notes. I can use it for notes for myself, I can use it to outline courses, I can use it to send reports or stats or things like that for my clients. I can just share the link to the note. So Evernote is probably my favorite. And then Ontraport. I’ve been using Ontraport maybe for only a year. Before that I was using 1ShoppingCart. So, I kind of like, I like systems that are all in one. There’s a little bit of danger in that, but I do like systems that are all in one. And so I’ve been using it for a year, but I keep finding out like new things and new things that I can do with it. So, I really love Ontraport, especially in terms of automation and being able to have my funnel and my systems working 24/7.

Jürgen
Yes, the marketing automation tools are great, aren’t they, the power that they have to enable you then to automate a lot of the recurring communications and recurring questions and processes that are in place that just …. It kind of comes back to what you were saying earlier about scalability. It really helps you with that as well, doesn’t it?

Tamala:
Absolutely. And one of the things that I had decided that I would focus on this year was better copywriting and better … using email more and better, like kind of infusing personality, more of my personality into the things that I write to my clients and the communications that I have with my clients and potential clients. And so Ontraport has really made that kind of fun.

Jürgen
Alright. We’ll definitely have links to those services underneath the show notes, so look out for those. And next question then is what’s the best way to keep a project or a client on track?

Tamala:
Definitely communication. I think having, setting clear expectations in the beginning, being very clear about what’s included in the project, what’s not, what the steps of the process are and what they’re not. And then just kind of making sure that you communicate throughout the process. And not …. I think a lot of times people, sometimes people don’t communicate because, like, we’re sensitive about our work, and we don’t want people to not like what we do and that kind of thing. And so I think having clear communication throughout the process and not being sensitive about your work and letting people feel comfortable in expressing what they may like or not like, or what they may need from you at a certain point in the process or not. For example, I’m not really a phone person, however, I make sure that my clients know, okay, email is probably my first line of communication, but if you ever need to talk with me, if we need to talk on the phone at any time, I’m available for that. If you ever have a question, if you ever have something that is not clear or something that you don’t like, I’m open to listen. So, making people feel comfortable enough to communicate throughout the process so that things go smoothly.

Jürgen
That’s great advice. Alright, what’s the #1 thing anyone can do to differentiate themselves?

Tamala:
It sounds very cliché, but, I mean, be you. I mean, you can’t get any more differentiated than that.

Jürgen
That’s right; there’s only one of you.

Tamala:
And I mean having mentors and that kind of thing is great. Having mentors for systems and processes and that kind of thing is really great, but I think you have to not lose your individuality while trying to implement processes and systems that work. You know, you have your methods and you have your strategies, but you also have to keep your personality and who you are. Just as an example, like, you know, using templated emails and that kind of thing. It’s great, you have a system, you have the templates, you have a place to start, but you have to infuse your personality into that.

Jürgen
Yes, that’s right. And it’s not hard to do, really, if you turn it around and read all of the emails or go through the whole process of the sequence as if you’re a client. I think that’s how it works, but it’s interesting, a lot of my guests answer similarly to that question, they say be yourself and so on, and perhaps it’s the entrepreneurial mindset, because you’re thinking back to the days when you were in the corporate world, that’s probably not encouraged there, is it?

Tamala:
Exactly. You know, I think my business became much more enjoyable for me when I realized that it’s my business, I can do it however I want. Because I’m never going to be like the, I don’t want to call people stuffy, but I’ve worked in Corporate America, that’s not how I run my business. Yes, I believe in excellence and doing things with systems and excellence and that kind of thing, but, you know, if you see me dressed up any day, it’s a special day. Any other day, I’m probably wearing T-shirts and flip flops. That’s me and that’s my personality. When I write my emails, when I write my sales pages, when I post on my social media, I’m casual because that’s just me and that’s just my personality. And I think a lot of times people feel like who they are has to be hidden in order to come across a certain way, and then you just kind of end up being a carbon copy of everybody else.

Jürgen
That’s right, Yes. And I have gotten a few emails from you, from your systems obviously, because I can tell they’re automated, but they are very full of personality. It sounds like you’re speaking to me personally, so yes, good job.

Tamala:
Thank you.

Jürgen
Alright. So what’s the future for your business then? Where are you headed?

Tamala:
Ideally, I am headed more towards a lot more recurring income, a lot more training and classes. A lot more one-to-many. Because for as long as I can remember, that was one of my … When I started online, because I can remember when I started online, that was one of my biggest dreams was to take my knowledge and my expertise and what I know and turn it into products and turn it into courses and training. Ever since I was studying Frank Kern and all of those people way back in 2007, 2008. I was studying Ryan Deiss back then when he had first introduced the Napkin Project, and then years later I became a certified partner with his company. So, that’s always been one of the things that I wanted to do. So, focusing a lot on creating online programs, but also figuring out how to do them in a way that doesn’t just kind of leave people flailing. But still offer some type of support for them, so that it’s not just like you’re just taking this course and you don’t have any other interaction or you don’t have any other type of support.

Jürgen
Yes. Do, you have any ideas how you’re going to go about that, the support part or the follow-up part particularly?

Tamala:
Well, you know the “normal,” quote unquote, or the typical thing nowadays is like Facebook groups. So, probably some form of either Facebook group … I’m actually still working on my signature course. Now I know the content, some of the content that I want in it, but I have not totally decided how I’m going to completely launch it just yet. So, I think it will probably either be a combination of Facebook group and either phone or webinar, like live training. Since Facebook started doing the live, that you can do the live training inside of your group, something to that effect. I’m not, I haven’t really jumped on the Facebook Live bandwagon, so if I did use it, I would probably use it more so in the group than anything.

Jürgen
Yes, Alright. Sounds good. So, what’s the #1 piece of advice you’d give to any business owner who wants to be a leader in innovation in their field?

Tamala:
Really decide on what you want to focus on and become an expert at it. When I first started, I was doing a lot of different things. I could, you know, put your ebooks on Amazon Kindle because, you know, I knew how to do it, I had done it for myself. I could write copy. In my former life, I was a proofreader editor; I wrote everything from brochures to small newspapers. So, copywriting. There’s a lot of stuff that I knew how to do, but it didn’t mean that I should have been trying to do it all. And when I decided to focus on WordPress customization and fixing WordPress sites, so like I could take any theme and kind of go in and fix whatever problems people were having, once I decided to really focus and become an expert at WordPress customizations, then that’s when my business really started to grow. Which it seems counterintuitive, but that’s kind of how it happened.

Jürgen
That’s right, Yes. The concept of focusing on a particular audience and then focusing on just one thing that you’re really good at or becoming really good at one thing is, as you say, it’s counterintuitive but it always works. And I remember talking to a guest a little while ago, and she said every time we’ve niched down more, the business has grown in leaps and bounds.

Tamala:
Absolutely.

Jürgen
Alright, well thank you for being on the podcast today, Tamala. I really appreciate your time and being part of the show and sharing your story. Where can people best reach out to you and say thank you?

Tamala:
I am usually on my Facebook page, which is TamalaHuntleyBiz and on my website, which is TamalaHuntley.com.

Jürgen
Okay, and we’ll have links to those, both sites on the show notes as well. And finally, who would you like to see me interview or hear me interview on the Innovabuzz Podcast in the future and why?

Tamala:
I have actually two people.

Jürgen
Okay.

Tamala:
One is my friend Lisa Wells. She is similar, very similar to me. Sometimes we’re kind of freaked out at how similar we are. I met her at a conference once, and then we kind of just really hit it off at that conference. But she is, she actually works with InfusionSoft. And so she does similar in terms of helping people implement systems and set up their systems. And she also trains VAs. But she works with InfusionSoft and coaches and that kind of thing. And then Allegra Sinclair who I also met online. She works with … Her current business, I think she’s doing kind of two different things, but helping business owners or helping women increase their confidence. And she is just a joy to talk to. I don’t know any other way to describe it. She’s just a joy to talk to. Whenever I talk to her, after I’m done, I kind of feel like Superwoman, like I can go do anything.

Jürgen
Okay, what was her first name?

Tamala:
It’s Allegra. A-L-L-E-G-R-A.

Jürgen
Allegra. Okay. Alright. Well, Allegra and Lisa, look out for an email from us, courtesy of Tamala to come and talk to us on the Innovabuzz Podcast.

Tamala:
Awesome.

Jürgen
So, thanks again, Tamala. I really appreciate you sharing your time and your insights with us on the Innovabuzz Podcast today. It’s very generous of you. I’ve really enjoyed this, and I’ve learned quite a bit as well, so hopefully the audience will too. And I wish you all the best for the future of your business, and let’s keep in touch. I’d be keen to find out all of the interesting places you travel to.

Tamala:
Absolutely. Thank you, and thank you for having me.

Jürgen
And we’ll have to organize a get-together so that you, I, and Kronda meet in person.

Tamala:
Yes, Yes.

Jürgen
Alright. Thanks.

Tamala:
Alright, have a good one. Bye-bye.

Jürgen
Bye.

Wrap Up:

I hope you enjoyed meeting Tamala as much as I did – she’s a bundle of energy and provided some great advice for everyone that is marketing online (and that’s all of you, right?)

All the show notes for this episode will be at innovabiz.com.au/tamalahuntley, that is T-A-M-A-L-A-H-U-N-T-L-E-Y, all lowercase, all one word, innovabiz.com.au/tamalahuntley, for all of the links and everything we spoke about in this episode .

Tamala suggested I interview Lisa Wells, another digital marketing specialist and Allegra Sinclair a personal development coach, on future InnovaBuzz podcasts. So Lisa and Allegra keep an eye on your Inbox for an invitation from me, for the InnovaBuzz Podcast, courtesy of Tamala Huntley.

Thank you for listening.  Pop over to iTunes or Stitcher or Pocket Casts and subscribe so you’ll never miss a future episode.  While you’re there, you might leave us a review, because reviews help us get found and your feedback helps us improve.  If there is anything you’d like us to cover, or questions you want answered on a future podcast, please send them to us.

Until next time, I’m Jürgen Strauss from Innovabiz.

Remember, if you don’t innovate, you stagnate, so think big, be adventurous and keep innovating!

Listen to the Podcast

Jürgen

Jürgen is the chief innovator and founder of Innovabiz who partner with innovative, exceptional business coaches to enable you to acquire more leads and more business by reaching your ideal target prospects with your message, so that you will achieve growth and be able to make a difference to more ideal clients. You can find Jürgen on LinkedIn, as well as on Innovabiz' Twitter, Facebook and Google+ Pages.

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